Idol 101: How to Do Idol Calls and Mixes

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Have you ever watched an idol live and thought “Wow, that looks so fun, but I have no idea what the fans are saying”? Maybe you’ve tried to learn some of the calls and mixes, but you can’t really remember them. Or maybe you know some of them, but you’d like to learn more. Well, I’ve got the guide for you! I’ve tried to compile all the calls and mixes that I know of that multiple groups do; many groups, agencies, and songs have their own special calls and mixes, for example Dempagumi and Moso Calibration’s Dear Stage Mix, but that’s for another guide (if people are interested). Alright, let’s start!


General Calls

Ooing

Ooing is one of the most common and easiest calls. It’s usually done at the end of a verse and you’ve probably heard it before.

Ohhh *clap clap* Ohhh *clap clap* Ohhh *clap clap* Ohhh *clap clap*

Example: Niji no Conquistador – Triangle Dreamer at 1:06

 

 

 

 

Sometimes instead of the two claps after the “ohhh”, you shout “hai!”

Also, sometimes before it you will shout Minna de issho ni ooing! (皆で一緒にオーイング!)

Urya Oi

This is another very common one that you’ve probably heard of. It’s usually done right before a mix, but sometimes it’s done by itself.

(Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi!

Example (done by itself): Alice Juban – Shin Adventure at 2:41

 

 

A variation done right before some mixes is:

(Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi!
Ah, mada ikanai
(Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi! (Urya!) Oi!
Ah, mada ikanai
Itsu iku no? Ima desho! or Hai se no!

This means “Ah, don’t go yet. Ah, don’t go yet. When are we going? I guess now!”

Example: Steam Girls – Alice no Ori at 0:53

 

 

 

PPPH

Another easy one, you just clap three times and shout hai! Sometimes, you jump while doing the “hai!” PPPH is also done during a verse.

*clap clap clap* Hai! *jump*

Example: Zettai Chokkyuu Joshi! Playballs – Diving Catch at 0:51

Fuwa Fuwa

If this has a name, I don’t know it, but in the chorus of many idol songs, you will go:

Yoo fuufuu! Fuwa fuwa!

In some cases, people get down low to the ground while doing the “fuufuu” and go back up after the call. Also, sometimes you clap two times before the “fuwa fuwa”.

After that call, this one will typically be added:

(Hai se- no) Ha-i, hai! Hai! Hai! Hai! Hai!

Example: Majibanch – Magical☆Dream at 1:36

 

 

 

 

 

Chou Kawaii

This isn’t super common, but sometimes during instrumental breaks of a song, everyone will yell:

(Name) kawaii, chou kawaii! (Name) kawaii, chou kawaii! (Name) kawaii, chou kawaii! (Name) kawaii, chou kawaii!
You usually continue for all members. Sometimes “Ah, i-ku-zo” is added to the beginning.

Chou kawaii just means super cute.

Example: Majibanch – NON☆STOP ga Tomaranai at the beginning

 

Yes Tiger!

Shouted by itself, usually right before a chorus. Not incredibly common, but you definitely hear it.

Example: Steam Girls – HIGH and LOW at 2:20

Variations on this are:

Yes! Yes! Yes Tiger!

Yes Tiger! Faibo! Wiper (Waipa)! (イエッ!タイガ!ファイボワイパー!)

Example: Manekikecha – Joudan Janai ne at 3:32

Myohontusuke

I don’t think this has a name either, but at the beginning of some songs you yell:

Myohontusuke! Kasentobijoukyo! Jya jya! Faibo! Wiper (Waipa)! (ミョーホントゥスケ!化繊飛除去!ジャージャー!ファイボー!ワイパー!)

Example: SHINGEKI – Sensen Fukoku

Minna de Issho ni

This is sometimes shouted before a member has a solo line and everyone, whether she’s their favorite member or not, does their call. Minna de issho ni means “together with everyone”.

Minna de issho ni (name) call (kooru)!

Example: Steam Girls – Donkusai Don’t Cry at 2:45

Gyakukaiten

In some idol songs, all of the fans will start running (well, in most cases, lightly jogging) in a circle and at a certain point, everyone will yell “ahh, gyakukaiten!” and start running the opposite way. Gyakukaiten just means something like “spin the opposite way”.

Example: Heisei Kotohime – Melody at 1:49

Member Calls

Everyone yells the calls that I’ve described up to this point, but for specific member calls, most people just yell them for their favorite member. There’s nothing stopping you from yelling them for all the members if you’d like, but you might get a few looks if you’re at a smaller live. Keep in mind that in most cases, you’ll yell the member’s first name, but if their first name is only two syllables, you’ll usually attach -chan. If they have a different nickname that’s commonly used, you might shout that or you might shout their first name. It’s probably a good idea to watch some live videos so you know for sure.

Chouzetsu Kawaii

Most commonly heard in 48G songs. It means something like “amazingly cute”.

Chouzetsu kawaii (name)!

Example: AKB48 – Everyday Katyusha at 0:34

Ore no

“Ore no” just means “my”. This one’s really common.

O-re no- (name)!

Can also be Ore no ore no (name)!

Sometimes followed with:

(Iya iya iya iya! Iya iya iya iya!) o-re no- (name)

Example: Niji no Conquistador – Triangle Dreamer at 2:23

Omae ga Ichiban

This is another popular one, it means “you’re the best/you’re number one”.

Omae ga ichiban! Omae ga ichiban! Omae ga ichiban! (Name)!

Example: Alice Juban/Kamen Joshi – Zenkai Hero at 1:25

This can be on its own or done after the “ore no” call. Sometimes just one “Omae ga ichiban” is done before the name call.

L, O, V, E, Lovely

I get the impression that this was used a bit more in older songs, but you still hear it.

L, O, V, E, Lovely (Raburii) (name)!

Example:  Shiritsu Ebisu Chuugaku – Kari Keiyaku no Cinderella at 1:09

(Name) no Hitomi ni Koishiteru!

This one’s not very common, but I’m including it anyway. It’s usually translated as “I can’t take my eyes off you”. Sometimes the name is shouted multiple times.

Example: Steam Girls/Slime Girls – Days at 3:52

Mixes

Mixes are longer than calls and often don’t really make any sense. It’s not uncommon for them to be in a language other than Japanese.

Standard Mix:

This is the most common mix you will always hear. It’s typically at the beginning of a song and if you only have time to memorize one thing before going to an idol live, this should be it.

Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!

Yossha ikuzo means “alright, let’s go!”

Example: AKB48 – Iiwake Maybe at the beginning

48G sticks with the “ah yossha ikuzo”, but other groups often shorten it to “sha ikuzo” or replace it with a simple “jya jya”.

In some cases, this will be added to the end:

Faibo!
Wiper (Waipa)!

Example: AKB48 Team 8 – 47 no Suteki na Machi e at 0:29

Another variation is:

Ah, Tiger (Taiga), Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Faibo!
Wiper (Waipa)!

Example: FES☆TIVE – Shidare Yanagi at 0:14:

Japanese Mix:

The Japanese Mix is also very common and is typically shouted during the second instrumental break if the standard mix was used during the first one. Unless I say otherwise, the mixes in other languages mean the same thing as the standard mix, just in whatever language is being used.

Ah, Mou iccho ikuzo!
Tora!
Hi!
Jinzou!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!

Mou iccho ikuzo means “let’s go again!” The “mou iccho ikuzo” is often replaced by “sha ikuzo” or “jya jya”.

Example: Manekikecha – Monster to Kecha at 1:57

In the case of 48G, the last three lines are combined into one (kasentobijoukyo)

Example: AKB48 – Iiwake Maybe at 1:29

Sometimes the tobi and joukyo are taken out entirely and the mix ends with “kasen”.

Another variation is:

(Toratoratoratoratoratoratoratoratoratoratoratora) Tora hi!
Jinzo!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!

Example: FES☆TIVE – Shidare Yanagi at 1:14:

Yet another is:

Tora hi tora hi 虎火虎火
Jinzou seni jinzou seni 人造繊維人造繊維
Ama shindou ama shindou あま振動あま振動
Kasentobijoukyo! 化繊飛除去

Example: Alice Juban – Alice no Jikan at 1:23

Ainu Mix

The Ainu mix is usually used at the very end of a song. It’s not as common as the first two, but still quite common. If you don’t know who the Ainu are, they are an indigenous people of Japan and Russia.

Chape!
Ape!
Kara!
Kina!
Rara!
Tusuke!
Myohontusuke!

Example: HKT48 – Saikou ka yo at 3:17:

In some cases (particularly with underground groups), you take the “myohontusuke” at the end out and replace with:

Uisupe!ウィスゥペ!
Kesui! ケスィ!
Suisupa! スィスゥパ!

Example: FES☆TIVE – Magical Parade at 3:47:

1.5-Ren Mix

This mix is commonly used in 48G songs. It combines the standard mix and half of the Japanese mix. I heard they started using it instead of the 3-Ren Mix most of the time because a lot of 48G fans didn’t know the Ainu Mix, but don’t quote me on that.

Ah~~~yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)
Fire (Faiya)
Cyber (Saiba)
Fiber (Faiba)
Diver (Daiba)
Viber (Baiba) バ
Jya jya!
Tora
Hi
Jinzou
Seni
Ah, mou iccho ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)
Fire (Faiya)
Cyber (Saiba)
Fiber (Faiba)
Diver (Daiba)
Viber (Baiba)
Jya jya!

Example: AKB48 – Everyday, Katyusha at the beginning

2-Ren Mix

The 2-Ren Mix combines the Standard and Japanese mixes.

Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Tora!
Hi!
Jinzou!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!

Example: AKB48 – Ponytail to Shushu at the beginning

3-Ren Mix

The 3-Ren Mix combines the Standard, Japanese, and Ainu mixes.

Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Tora!
Hi!
Jinzou!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!
Chape!
Ape!
Kara!
Kina!
Rara!
Tusuke!
Myohontusuke!

Example: AKB48 – overture at 0:25

Enchou Mix

I didn’t know this one for a long time, but you hear it used a fair amount at underground idol lives. I haven’t seen it on its own, but it’s used in combination with other mixes.

Faibo ファイボー
Wiper (Waipa) ワイパー
Farmer (Faama) ファーマー
Jasper (Jyasupa) ジャスパー
Howaipa ホワイパー
Cooper (Kuupa) クーパー
Airscraper (Iesukureipa) イエスクレイパー!

Standard + Enchou Mix

Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Faibo ファイボー
Wiper (Waipa) ワイパー
Farmer (Faama) ファーマー
Jasper (Jyasupa) ジャスパー
Howaipa ホワイパー
Cooper (Kuupa) クーパー
Airscraper (Iesukureipa) イエスクレイパー!

Example: Alice Juban – Zenkai Hero at 0:58

Standard + Enchou + Japanese Mix

Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Faibo ファイボー
Wiper (Waipa) ワイパー
Farmer (Faama) ファーマー
Jasper (Jyasupa) ジャスパー
Howaipa ホワイパー
Cooper (Kuupa) クーパー
Airscraper (Iesukureipa) イエスクレイパー!
Tora!
Hi!
Jinzou!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!

Example: Steam Girls – HIGH and LOW at 3:08

Standard + Enchou + Japanese + Ainu Mix

This one’s long…
Ah, yossha ikuzo!
Tiger (Taiga)!
Fire (Faiya)!
Cyber (Saiba)!
Fiber (Faiba)!
Diver (Daiba)!
Viber (Baiba)!
Jya jya!
Faibo ファイボー
Wiper (Waipa) ワイパー
Farmer (Faama) ファーマー
Jasper (Jyasupa) ジャスパー
Howaipa ホワイパー
Cooper (Kuupa) クーパー
Airscraper (Iesukureipa) イエスクレイパー!
Tora!
Hi!
Jinzou!
Seni!
Ama!
Shindou!
Kasen!
Tobi!
Joukyo!
Chape!
Ape!
Kara!
Kina!
Rara!
Tusuke!
Myohontusuke!

Example: Alice Juban – Alice no Jikan at the beginning of the song

 

When it comes to the combined mixes, the same rules apply. “Yossha ikuzo!” can be replaced with “Sha ikuzo! or “Jya jya!”, Kasen, tobi, and joukyo can be combined into kasentobijoukyo, tobi and joukyo can be omitted, and “Myohontusuke!” can be replaced with “Uisupe! Kesui! Suisupa!” It all depends on the group, really.

I Can Fly Mix

This mix isn’t very common, but it’s not so uncommon that you never hear it. In fact, it seems to be gaining popularity.

Takamaru yo! Takamaru yo! Takamaru hikumaru bismarck! 高まるよ!高まるよ!高まる低まるビスマルク!
Shijimaaru! Arushindo! Kazudansu! シジマール!アルシンド!カズダンス!
Knee high! Oh hai! *clap* ニーハイ!オーハイ!(手拍子1回)
Kan chuhai! Oolonghai! Natural (Nachuraru) high! I can fly ! *jump* 缶チューハイ!ウーロンハイ!ナチュラルハイ!アイ・キャン・フライ!

Sometimes the takamaru yos are omitted.

Example: Moso Calibration – Itsudatte Sekai ni Fighting Pose at 1:58

Pan Mix

Even less common, but I’ve still heard it a few times. Pan means bread in Japanese.

Pan, pan, pan, pan, pokemon pan! パン、パン、パン、パン、ポケモンパン!
Fresh bread (furesshu bureddo), ito pan! フレッシュブレッド、伊藤パン!
Matsutakako! Matsutakako! 松たか子!松たか子!
Yamazaki Haru no Pan Matsuri! ヤマザキ春のパンまつり!

Example: Moso Calibration – You wo Check Shimasu at 1:49

Spanish Mix

One of the more complicated and harder to remember mixes. There’s a group named Dear L mana that, since their name comes from the Spanish word “hermana”, uses this mix all the time, so if you’re interested in them, you’d better learn it!

Vamos! バーモス!
Tigre! ティグレ!
Fuego! フェゴ!
Ciber (Shiberu)! シベル!
Fibra! フィブラ!
Buzo! ブゾ!
Viber (Biburaru)! ビブラル!
Jersey (Herusei)! ヘルセイ!
Volare! ボラーレ!
Limpiaparabrisas! リンピアパラブリサス!

Example: FES☆TIVE – Shidare Yanagi at 3:16

Hangul Mix

If you’re not familiar with Korean (and maybe even if you are, idk), this mix is pretty hard to remember. It’s relatively uncommon, but I know Alice Project, TOKYO SWEET PARTY, and Tenshimeshi use it.

Cha-kada~ チャ・カダ~
Horani ホランイ
Buru ブル
Injyo インジョ
Somyu ソミュ
Henyo ヘニョ
Shindo シンド
Fahakusomyu ファハクソミュ
Neuda ネウダ
Jegoジェゴ

Example: Alice Juban – Shin Adventure at 5:01

 

Arabic Mix

Moso Calibration uses this mix, but I’m pretty sure it’s been used by other groups too, so I’ll include it.

(I’ll be honest, I can’t even find how to actually romanize in Arabic so I’m just going to in katakana)

Suifuriasuiiru! スィフリーアスィール!
Namiru! ナミル!
Naaru! ナール!
Suinaaii! スィナーイー!
Nasuiijyu! ナスィージュ!
Gatasa! ガタサ!
Hazza! ハッザ!
Haitunshinaaii! ハイトゥンシナーイー!

Yeah, good luck with this one.

Example: Moso Calibration’s Mahou no Juice at 0:16:

 

Gachikoi Koujou

I’m including this in a whole category of its own. It’s not exactly a call or mix, but more of a speech: actually, gachikoi koujou means something like “truly in love speech”. You hear it quite a bit and it seems to be getting more and more popular, probably because of its usage in 47 no Suteki na Machi e.

Iitai koto ga, arun da yo! (Nani nani?) 言いたいことが、あるんだよ!(なになに?)
Yappari (name) wa, kawaii yo! (Nani nani?) やっぱり◯◯◯は、かわいいよ!(なになに?)
Suki suki daisuki, yappa suki! (Nani nani?) 好き好き大好き、やっぱ好き!(なになに?)
Yatto mitsuketa, ohimesama (Nani nani?) やっと見つけた、お姫様(なになに?)
Ore ga umarete, kita riyuu (Nani nani?) 俺が生まれて、きた理由(なになに?)
Sore wa omae ni, deau tame (Nani nani?) それはお前に、出会うため(なになに?)
Ore to issho ni, jinsei ayumou (Nani nani?) 俺と一緒に、人生歩もう(なになに?)
Sekai de ichiban, aishiteru! 世界で一番、愛してる!
A, i, shi, te, ru! ア、イ、シ、テ、ル!

Example: AKB48 Team 8 – 47 no Suteki na Machi e at 2:37

It roughly translates to something like:

I have something to say! (What what?)
Indeed (name) is cute! (What what?)
I like her, I like her, indeed I love her! (What what?)
I finally found my princess! (What what?)
The reason I was born (What what?)
That was in order to meet you (What what?)
Let’s walk through life together (What what?)
You’re the one I love most in this world!
I- love- you-!

Yeahhhh…a bit dramatic, huh? Some might even call it creepy, but it’s all in good fun for most fans. Because of how intense it is, most people only yell it if they really like one of the members of the group. If you don’t think you can memorize it, don’t want to shout something so embarrassing, or you’re pretty casual about the group you’re watching, just do the “nani nani” parts.


That’s it for my call and mix guide! Did you learn anything? Did I miss out on anything important? What’s your favorite call or mix? I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

14 thoughts on “Idol 101: How to Do Idol Calls and Mixes

    1. Thanks for commenting! I’m glad you liked it! I don’t speak Spanish so I just had to memorize it, but I’d imagine it’d feel pretty ridiculous for you to go to a live and just shout stuff like limpiaparabrisas huh? Haha

      Like

    1. Yeah! It’s
      Tora
      Hi
      Jinzou
      Seni
      Ama
      Shindou
      Kasen
      Tobi
      Joukyou
      Tobi
      Kasen
      Shindou
      Ama
      Seni
      Jinzou
      Hi
      Tora
      Hi
      Jinzou
      Seni
      Minna de issho ni (name) call (kooru)!

      Like

      1. So great that you wrap this up. This includes almost all the mix and call I’ve heard
        (except the one using in specific songs of specific group eg. wasuta – inu neko)

        FYI. Jinsoufaiyamix This mix length is long as Gachikoi.
        Usually be used in case the meaning of the song doesn’t go well with Gachikoi (From where I’m from)
        We don’t want to use gachikoi in every songs, do we?

        Jinzou Faiya Faibo Waipa
        Taiga Taiga tatatata Taiga
        Chape Ape Karakina x2
        Myohontusuke! (Clap) Waipa

        Faiya Faiya
        Tora Tora Karakina
        Chape Ape Faama Ama Ama Jasper
        Tora Tiger Tora Tiger
        Jinzou Seni Iet Tiger!

        Example: https://youtu.be/fuoAb6AMk8Q?t=2m36s
        from Thai Idol Group “Sweat16!” so the pronunciation
        might not sound like Japanese

        Like

  1. OMG !!
    i love this thread.thanks a lot for you who’s make this ❤
    i've been a long time following 48g,then yeah i bored with standard 48 chant mix,
    then i interested to underground idol (like maneki kecha,fes tive& 2zicon)
    .
    btw did you heard the mix like this?
    "jinzou faia..faibowaipa
    taiga taiga..tatatatataiga"
    what the name is that?
    thanks 😀

    Like

  2. Thanks for the info! Big help!
    Also wonder if you can help but there another mix i always hear but cant really get from all the shouting…
    goes something like’ zettaiya zettaiya zettai **********

    Cheers!

    Like

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